AS FAR AS THE EYE CAN SEE

VTxT’s aesthetic code of concision, clarity, restraint and refinement involves an iterative use of parsing to strip away the superfluous. The goal – to get to essentials that celebrate economy of means and precision Monolithic forms, attenuation of lines/edges, economy of material palette are some of the tools used by VTxT “to make things disappear”.

Minimalism is not the end-game for VTxT. Its Less Is More ethos seeks ways of articulating the specificities of culture and place without the literal use of ornaments. Instead of creating overt formal statements, the dynamics of architectural form and space are sought to create subtle experience and more importantly, a human embodiment in design.

VTxT recognises that design is not pure art. Design is accountable to briefs and programmes; it has to consider fitness of shape/style for purpose and for private house commissions, the personalities of clients. The last, VTxT facilitates via close dialogue with clients so that it can uncover the particularities of each commission. Design with its affordances exists at the nexus of culture, politics, sociology, technology, economics, etc.

As an adjunct, VTxT explores design with theatre set commissions. Set design has its own language. It can embody the liminal; space-time considerations that are not always easy to incorporate into architecture and interior design. Where appropriate, ideas developed for sets are incorporated into other commissions.
Language, as John Berger describes, embodies the articulate and inarticulate. And design, in the spirit of yuugen can articulate the unseen by suggestion, with atmosphere. For VTxT, form, space, affordances and atmosphere come together to create texts.

“design is not the act of amazing an audience with the novelty of forms and materials; it is the originality that repeatedly extracts astounding ideas from the crevices of the commonness of everyday life.”

Kenya Hara


VTxT’s aesthetic code of concision, clarity, restraint and refinement involves an iterative use of parsing to strip away the superfluous. The goal – to get to essentials that celebrate economy of means and precision Monolithic forms, attenuation of lines/edges, economy of material palette are some of the tools used by VTxT “to make things disappear”.

Minimalism is not the end-game for VTxT. Its Less Is More ethos seeks ways of articulating the specificities of culture and place without the literal use of ornaments. Instead of creating overt formal statements, the dynamics of architectural form and space are sought to create subtle experience and more importantly, a human embodiment in design.

VTxT recognises that design is not pure art. Design is accountable to briefs and programmes; it has to consider fitness of shape/style for purpose and for private house commissions, the personalities of clients. The last, VTxT facilitates via close dialogue with clients so that it can uncover the particularities of each commission. Design with its affordances exists at the nexus of culture, politics, sociology, technology, economics, etc.

As an adjunct, VTxT explores design with theatre set commissions. Set design has its own language. It can embody the liminal; space-time considerations that are not always easy to incorporate into architecture and interior design. Where appropriate, ideas developed for sets are incorporated into other commissions.

Language, as John Berger describes, embodies the articulate and inarticulate. And design, in the spirit of yuugen can articulate the unseen by suggestion, with atmosphere. For VTxT, form, space, affordances and atmosphere come together to create texts.

“design is not the act of amazing an audience with the novelty of forms and materials; it is the originality that repeatedly extracts astounding ideas from the crevices of the commonness of everyday life.”

Kenya Hara

VINCENT LIM


Vincent Lim established Visual Text Architects (VTxT) in 2010.

Prior to that, he practised at Bedmar & Shi Designers/B&S&T Architects (1994 to 2000) and was a partner of VeTarchitecture (2000 – 2010) before setting up VTxT.

Vincent graduated from the National University of Singapore winning both the Singapore Institute of Architects Medal and the Board of Architects Prize (1994). He was also subsequently awarded the Certificate of Commendable Performance in the Board of Architects Professional Practice Examination (1999). Other accolades include a silver award in the 2003 SIA-ICI Colour Awards and an Honorary mention in the S3: Steel Space Structure Steel Pavilion Design Ideas Competition (2007). He was also featured in URA’s “25 Under 45: The Next Generation” (2012) as an up-and-coming architect. And as a set designer, he was nominated for Best Set Design for “Good People” in the 2008 Life Theatre Awards 2008.

As a writer, Vincent has contributed to design magazines since 1991; was editor of 2 issues of The Singapore Architect and has written the commemorative book for Changi Terminal 3. He currently holds an adjunct editor position with the Centre for Liveable Cities and is a member of the publication committee of the Singapore Institute of Architects’ publication.

He has taught at the Department of Architecture, National University of Singapore in both part-time and adjunct capacities.


Vincent Lim established Visual Text Architects (VTxT) in 2010.

Prior to that, he practised at Bedmar & Shi Designers/B&S&T Architects (1994 to 2000) and was a partner of VeTarchitecture (2000 – 2010) before setting up VTxT.

Vincent graduated from the National University of Singapore winning both the Singapore Institute of Architects Medal and the Board of Architects Prize (1994). He was also subsequently awarded the Certificate of Commendable Performance in the Board of Architects Professional Practice Examination (1999). Other accolades include a silver award in the 2003 SIA-ICI Colour Awards and an Honorary mention in the S3: Steel Space Structure Steel Pavilion Design Ideas Competition (2007). He was also featured in URA’s “25 Under 45: The Next Generation” (2012) as an up-and-coming architect. And as a set designer, he was nominated for Best Set Design for “Good People” in the 2008 Life Theatre Awards 2008.

As a writer, Vincent has contributed to design magazines since 1991; was editor of 2 issues of The Singapore Architect and has written the commemorative book for Changi Terminal 3. He currently holds an adjunct editor position with the Centre for Liveable Cities and is a member of the publication committee of the Singapore Institute of Architects’ publication.

He has taught at the Department of Architecture, National University of Singapore in both part-time and adjunct capacities.

 

Review of Family Affairs, The Necessary Stage

"Vincent Lim’s set is a restrained yet dynamic collection of simple wooden frames that alternately peel open or fold up into a 3 room flat, a dementia care centre and even an abstract coffin, complete with hanging hooks for the various characters’ costumes."

Sim Xinyi – Bakchormeeboy - 2017

Review of Boxing Day, The Necessary Stage

"Vincent Lim’s mobile set craftily converts itself from ledges and desks to moving masses and waves."

“Over-exposed tragedy treated with startling freshness”, Aparna V Roddam - The Straits Times

Review of Best Of (His Story), The Necessary Stage

"The flux is mirrored by Sani’s constant movement in the spare, but richly symbolic set by Vincent Lim."

Nabila Said - 2016

Review of Revelations, The Necessary Stage

"The set and lighting tied in effectively with the mood of the piece. Set designer Vincent Lim placed a single sliver of an inclined platform on stage."

“Refreshing revelations”, Clara Chow - The Straits Times - 2003

Review of Poor Thing, The Necessary Stage

"And like the centrepiece of its very inventive stage set – designer Vincent Lim’s two partly-stripped down cars – the characters in Poor Thing lay everything, warts and all.
Revelations, The Necessary Stage"

Mayo Martin - The New Paper - 2014

Review of Model Citizens, The Necessary Stage

"As art it might not be everyone’s cup of tea, but Model Citizen was a very polished production in three languages (Chinese, Bahasa, Indonesia and English), and comples changes took place swiftly on a simple set involving three cupboards of a design, and it pains me to say this, bordered on genius."

“On stage: a well-ordered liberty”, New Straits Times - 2011

Review of Gemuk Girls, The Necessary Stage

"True to a traditional black box staging, Gemuk Girls is minimalist and stark. Set designer Vincent Lim has come up with large wooden platforms that span the width of the stage and can be rolled back and forth and locked in space. This simple feature conjures up a world that is both transient and immutable. Sometimes, the platforms provide a path for the actors to march up and down on. At other times, the actors lie beneath them: they become a quiet resting point where the actors can hide away from the world.

....the set – simple yet rich in symbolism – add a superb aesthetic gloss."

“Size matters”, Naeem Kapadia - The Flying Inkpot - 2011

Review of Good People, The Necessary Stage

"The action was played out against a simple and effective set made up of layers of hospital curtains, drawn and undrawn to mark transitions between scenes and venues."

“Playing up differences”, Adeline Chia - The Straits Times - 2007

Review of Godeatgod, The Necessary Stage

"The 80-minute piece unfolded on designer Vincent Lim’s anonymous, grey-panelled set, akin to a cosmic conference hall or airport lounge."

“Asking the right questions sets the Necessary Stage”, Clarissa Onn - The Straits Times - 2004

Review of Binjai Park

“Good design, it is said, recedes into the background and appears to have always been there. Lim’s treatment of the space is a classic illustration of this principle.”

Ryan Wu - Form - 2010

Review of Haigsville

“Nowhere in the entire house is Vincent’s steady hand and consummate skill in controlling excess most evident than here.”

Victor Chen - Form - 2010

Review of Li Hwan View

“Most architects are pre-occupied by these same concerns but some resolve them better than others. In this residential project, Vincent proves his expertise. There is a crisp edge to his lines and eloquence in the geometry and spatial flow with a wee hint of quirkiness in the details such as the V-shaped columns steel structural columns in the semi-open deck.”

Seraphina Woon - Form - 2016

Review of White House Park

“What they asked for, they got in spades. Designed in the form of two pavilions bridged by a comparatively modern block marked by the copious use of glass, what Lim delivered is not just evocative of the past but sensitive to terrain, climate and even calendar year”

Lauren Tan - Prestige - 2012

Review of White House Park

“...the clients are a young couple with a penchant for nostalgia and collecting antiques such as Victorian era encaustic tiles and colourful stained glass panes with the occasional ecclesiastical theme, Vincent has ingeniously integrated them into the interior architecture with understated panache.”

Stuart Lin - Form - 2012

Review of Bukit Tunggal

“The design is a striking visual assemblage. The second story, a Miesian-like box clad in finely detailed exposed steel and slender timber louvres, “floats” above the lower floor that is predominantly glass and grey granite panels.”

Robert Powell - Singapore Good Class Bungalow - 2015